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Published on: May 29, 2015
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Avian flu's impacts continue to challenge global trade http://pr.co/p/0027il
Summary
The global case of avian flu has had a big impact on international markets. The global trade streams and prices are expected to remain under pressure for the remainder of 2015, according to Rabobank’s latest Poultry Quarterly Q2 report. The long-term impact may be significant due to several trade bans on breeding stock in importing countries. Producers in countries with balanced markets are continuing to enjoy healthy margins. Global approaches to deal with avian flu are more important than ever.
Details

Rabobank expects prices to remain under further pressure in the next months. “Poultry industry fundamentals are facing meaningful headwinds with stronger than expected feed prices due to a strong US dollar, increased competition from falling pork prices and restrictions on trade,” says Rabobank animal protein analyst Nan-Dirk Mulder. “Prices for whole chicken, leg quarters and chicken feet are declining further, while breast meat prices remain relatively strong.”

Supply growth discipline is important under such worsening conditions. This has been proven by countries with healthy market balances in their markets like US, Brazil, South Africa and Japan where the industry is still making good margins.

Rabobank believes that global approaches to deal with avian flu are more important than ever, with strict biosecurity standards and adjusted industry business models to deal with the new market reality. Governments should follow international guidelines regarding avian flu-based trade restrictions. Many countries in Asia, including China, who have implemented restrictions on trade on breeding stock might be affected by low supply next year due to expected future shortages in local breeding value chains.

Regional Outlook for Poultry Industry

  • EU: Slight margin recovery. Improved trade position due to weak euro and possible lifting of avian flu related trade restrictions.
  • US: Wave of HPAI outbreaks, but broiler sector less impacted. Margins still strong on robust local market demand.
  • Brazil: Competitive position in global trade. Weak real and avian flu bans for competitors.
  • Russia: Less bullish market, with ongoing higher feed costs and removal wheat export tax.
  • China: Fewer avian flu cases, but still big impact. Margins to lowest level in five years.
  • Thailand: Oversupply despite strong exports
  • South Africa: Improved margins, but outlook more clouded on likely return of EU exporters

For more information please contact the report’s author:

Nan-Dirk Mulder: nan-dirk.mulder@rabobank.com

For other information, please contact Rabobank press office:

Madelon.kaspers@rabobank.com, Tel: +31 610887244

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Quotes
“Poultry industry fundamentals are facing meaningful headwinds with stronger than expected feed prices due to a strong US dollar, increased competition from falling pork prices and restrictions on trade”. “Prices for whole chicken, leg quarters and chicken feet are declining further, while breast meat prices remain relatively strong.”

— Rabobank animal protein analyst Nan-Dirk Mulder